This is a photo diary of my costuming "travels"; where I've learned and struggled to make historical costumes for myself. They're not always pretty, but always fun. most of the time. And I want to share with others what I learn along the way. **You can find me on Facebook, or have my posts delivered to your email by signing up at the lower part of the right column.**



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HI, my name is Val. I'm a member of Costumer's Guild West in Los Angeles, member & Past President of the San Diego Costume Guild, member of Orange County Costume Guild, a representative of the San Diego History Center, & an honorary member of SITU (Someplace in Time, Unlimited) in Seattle. This year I am the Dean of Costume College 2018. I make my own historical costumes but don't sell any unless I get tired of one.The eras I've made so far are 1770 up to 1918. My favorite is the 1880s bustle.

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Monday, October 16, 2017

FOLLOW-UP ON BIEDERMEIER HAIR RIBBON LOOPS

Last week I finished up making my set of hair ribbon loops that I thought I would wear on my 1830s wig for a fashion show but after putting the crown on with the chess pieces (more on that in another post), you really couldn’t see the hair or the ribbon loops. So off they came for another day.

They looked awfully cute though and I can’t wait to make more, in a variety of colors someday. This was kind of the look I was going for, loops plus some spikey things to the side. 
A reminder of how I did my ribbon loops: I cut the ribbons to the length I wanted to fold in half to make them, and also ones to poke out on the sides with a V cut into them. I brushed some of the Stiffy liquid on the backsides, folded them into a loop and used a straight pin at the bottom to hold them together. I think it took about an hour to dry. From my previous test, I liked the hold of the Stiffy ones best. 
I thought at first I would be pinning each loop into my hair and trying to get them to stay at the angles I wanted them but that didn’t work. So then I came up with the idea of sewing them all together, and that worked perfect. I first test pinned them into my hair to check the angles, then basted one loop to one cut single ribbon. 
Next, I thought at first I would be pinning each loop into my hair and trying to get them to stay at the angles I wanted them but that didn’t work. So then I came up with the idea of sewing them all together, and that worked perfect. I first test pinned them into my hair to check the angles, then basted one loop to one cut single ribbon. I pinned the two sets of ribbon together at the angle I wanted, and basted those together. I didn’t like that raw finish on back, and made a looped bow to cover them. *Disclaimer, I’m horrible at making bows.*

With those done, it was easy to just use bobby pins to place it on my topknot. They’re in there quite sturdy too. 

There’s so many fun things you can do with this style by adding flowers, leaves, combs, sticks of beads, wheat sheaves, you name it. The sillier the better.


I have a dress in my MAKE THESE file that I hope to incorporate this hair comb with. 

If you want to see some more of these hairstyles, watch the movie, Wives & Daughters, based on Elizabeth Gaskill’s book.  




                                                         ~~~Val~~~

1 comment:

  1. Nice!! Informative and APPRECIATED!!

    ReplyDelete

I would love to hear if this was any help to you. Pretty please!